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The Soulcruzer Podcast

The soulcruzer podcast is a podcast of personal narratives, stories, observations, found sounds, and conversations with interesting people. Topics include: personal development, self-improvement, wisdom, philosophy, health and wellbeing, social artistry, social tech, and the general game of life.

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Thursday: The Musical Journey Show 20:00 – 21:30 GMT

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From the main blog

chasing ghosts

I’m tired of chasing ghosts. These elusive and insubstantial phantoms that manifest themselves as distractions and obsessions and keep me from truly living in the present. It doesn’t matter which form they take whether they’re shadows of past regrets, spectres of unattainable aspirations, or mirages of societal expectations, they pull me away from my centre, fragment my attention, and dilute my sense of self. Chasing ghosts reminds me of Plato’s allegory of the cave, where prisoners are shackled to cave floor and forced to watch shadows on the wall, which they then mistake for reality because it’s the only reality

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Games
Soulcruzer

Trivium: the place where three paths meet

I’ve been experimenting with making interactive, philosophical text-based games as a way to help folks explore philosophical concepts as part of their own personal growth. This first game explores three ways of being. Choose the path that resonates with you. Will you find enlightenment or succumb to despair? The choice is yours. Start the Game

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Posts
Soulcruzer

what prevents us from challenging the status quo?

(1) The status quo is a comforting illusion of stability that often appears to us as being immovable. It’s the familiar landscape of the well-trodden path that puts our minds and bodies at ease. Yet, beneath the surface of this apparent tranquillity is a complex web of factors that holds us back from challenging the status quo. This resistance isn’t merely the result of external forces but also of a deeply ingrained internal struggle. (2) Fear is perhaps the most potent barrier, casting its long shadow over our aspirations for change. ‬Fear of the unknown, failure, and being shunned by

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received wisdom

Reading through The Socratic Way of Questioning this morning has got me thinking about received wisdom—those beliefs and ideas we all seem to take for granted. You know, the stuff passed down from your parents or other authority figures in your youth that you accepted without much questioning. Think of your received wisdom as the factory settings of your thinking. It’s good enough to get you started, but now it’s time to customise it and update your software to the latest truths based on current evidence. What was true five years ago, or even yesterday, isn’t necessarily true today. It

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Posts
Soulcruzer

Co-Intelligence

Reading through my notes on the first couple of chapters of Ethan Mollick’s book, Co-Intelligence, I’m fascinated by the idea of GenAI as a co-intelligence. This isn’t just another tool in our toolbox. It’s an evolution. We’ve had tools to augment our strength, our senses, our calculations — but never before have we had a tool that amplifies our very thoughts. Mollick positions AI as not merely an invention; but an alien intelligence, a partner in thought unlike any we’ve seen before. The potential is HUGE, Jerry! It is poised to have an even bigger impact on us than the

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Posts
Soulcruzer

narrow attention vs wide attention

I continued reading Marion Milner’s A Life of One’s Own today. She points out two ways of paying attention: Narrow Attention: This is the kind of attention we usually give to everyday tasks and activities. It’s focused, goal-oriented, and often driven by our immediate desires and interests. Narrow attention is like a spotlight, illuminating only a small part of our experience while filtering out the rest. It’s useful for getting things done, but it can also lead to boredom, tunnel vision, and a feeling of disconnection from the world around us. Wide Attention: This is a more open, receptive, and

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